Posts Tagged ‘geiger’

A spotter’s guide to the SBM-20 Geiger counter tube

Sunday, November 16th, 2014
SBM-20 and friends

click to enlarge

The picture above shows a variety of Geiger tubes that are commonly sold under the name “SBM-20″. This post is an attempt to clear up some of the confusion around these tubes and to share some information about the different tube styles I have encountered in the wild since I first started selling Geiger Counter kits in 2011.

This is my spotter’s guide to the SBM-20 Geiger counter tube.

SBM-20

This is the quintessential Soviet Geiger Counter tube. 400V operating voltage. 105mm overall length. Gold (brass?) color. Symmetric end caps. Positive terminal is usually marked ‘+’, but if not, it’s the end closest to the CBM-20 marking. Date codes are always four digit, but I have seen both MMYY and YYMM (assuming I am interpreting the numbers correctly). Year of manufacture varies widely but most are 1970s – 1990s.

SBM-20U

Very common alternate version of the SBM-20. Shorter 95mm overall length. Positive terminal is exposed rod with no end cap. Soldering to this terminal can be a challenge as the plating is usually quite oxidized and the underlying metal is steel.  I’ve also seen the internal glass seals fail after soldering. These are often sold as SBM-20 tubes, and unscrupulous eBay sellers will sell the SBM-20/SBM-20U interchangeably.

SBM-20 (alternative negative terminal style)

Slightly longer positive terminal. 105mm overall length. Negative terminal is formed from the tube body (cost saving design?). Tubes I have seen are marked ’77’, presumably date code for 1977. Rare.

STS-5 / CTC-5

Older version of the SBM-20. Slightly longer overall length, approx. 110mm. Silver color. Positive terminal is marked + and closest to the CTC-5 marking. Date codes I have seen are mid-1960s through 1970s. I haven’t confirmed this, but I suspect date code is roman numeral month followed by arabic numeral year, eg. VIII 65. Aside from longer overall length, properties and performance are very similar to SBM-20. Less common than SBM-20, presumably because they are older and were not manufactured in great numbers across as many years. Sometimes sold under the name SBM-20.  They are generally interchangeable with “real” SBM-20 tubes, but given that they are significantly older, failure rate might be higher (unconfirmed).

Summary

My Geiger Counter kit will accommodate the STS-5 and all of the SBM-20 variants shown. The SBM-20U requires a short jumper wire to connect the positive terminal to the PCB. I recommend using an alligator clip or wrapping a wire around the terminal to avoid compromising the glass to metal seal with the heat of the solder.

Geiger Counter kits (almost) out of stock

Sunday, November 16th, 2014

Holiday sales are picking up and shipments of a few critical components are just now arriving. As of today I only have a few Geiger Counter kits left in stock. I expect to sell out within the next few days, but should have more kits ready within 2-3 weeks.

International customers – I recommend ordering now to guarantee delivery by Christmas.

– Jeff

PS: Rescue Shield kits are running low as well. Once I sell out I probably won’t have more before early 2015.

Rescue Shield kits back in stock – fix your bricked AVRs!

Saturday, August 3rd, 2013

A new batch of HV Rescue Shield kits are fresh off the hotplate and ready to rescue your bricked AVRs! You can purchase kits here.

Also, I only have a few Geiger Counter kits left in stock. Things have been pretty busy here lately, so it will likely be a few weeks before I can build more. Get one before they’re all gone!

Both of these kits are great for both electronics newbies and experienced kit builders.

Don’t know how to solder? Learn how today!

Come see my Glowy Geiger Chimes at the 2013 Maker Faire Bay Area!

Sunday, May 12th, 2013

It’s that time of the year again! The 2013 Maker Faire Bay Area is next weekend (May 18-19th) in San Mateo, California.

I haven’t had time to post about it, but over the past few weeks I’ve been busy working on a special project for the Maker Faire this year.

This year I am bringing a new and improved version of the “Geiger counter-powered ambient music thing” that I threw together at the last minute last year (and never really came up with a good name for). In that project, I connected five of my open source Geiger Counter kits to an Arduino that sent MIDI commands to a Sparkfun Music Instrument Shield. When each Geiger counter was triggered by background radiation or one of the weakly radioactive sources nearby, the Arduino would send a command to the shield to play a musical note.

This year I’m bringing a new and improved version that uses a new piece of hardware that I designed specifically for the Faire – the Geiger Pad.

Each Geiger Pad contains a fully functional Geiger Counter based on my Geiger counter kit. The output of the Geiger counter is connected to a cluster of 14 very bright 5mm UV LEDs. On top of the Pad is a petri dish filled with uranium marbles. Each time the Geiger counter detects that a gamma ray was emitted by the marbles, it flashes the UV LEDs. Since the uranium marbles fluoresce green under UV light, this produces a brilliant green glow.

Today (yes, once again at the last minute) I finally got all the pieces together and working. If you come to the Faire you’ll be able to see it in person, but I also posted a short video on flickr:

The Maker Faire website lists me in Expo Hall, but it’s more likely that I’ll be somewhere in the dark area of Fiesta Hall instead. Check the Maker Faire website later in the week for more details.

See you at the Faire!

Glowy Geiger Chimes at makerfaire.com

Star Jar, a Geiger counter triggered LED decoration

Tuesday, December 25th, 2012

UK artist Nikki Pugh posted this video of her Star Jar, a Geiger counter triggered LED decoration for the holidays. This project is based on her holiday light display from last year. This version incorporates fading transitions is completely powered by the mains.

The light changes are triggered by a MightyOhm Geiger counter kit which detects background radiation and cosmic rays.

If you’re interested to learn how this project was made, check out the instructable.

Star Jar from nikkipugh on Vimeo.


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